phosphorescent – to willie 2009

album of the year 2009

In 1975, Willie Nelson released a tribute to one of the original country outlaws, Lefty Frizzell, called TO LEFTY FROM WILLIE. Phosphorescent’s TO WILLIE is an alt-country continuation of the same concept. Its 11 songs are all moderately obscure Willie Nelson tunes (no “Red Headed Stranger” or “On the Road Again”) delivered in a mournful indie country style that reveals Nelson’s oft-underestimated connection to this particular sub-genre. Highlights include “I Gotta Get Drunk” and “Reasons To Quit.”

http://www.mediafire.com/?nzz2ojytajz

avett brothers – i and love and you 2009

North Carolina sibling duo the Avett Brothers return in 2009, fresh off a few years of building a cult following for its melodic and rootsy alt-bluegrass sound, with the subdued I AND LOVE AND YOU. The opening single and title track basks in piano-pop splendor in an odd mix of Beach Boys, Byrds, and the Band.

The Avett Brothers continue charting the same musical course as EMOTIONALISM and MIGNONETTE on major-label debut I AND LOVE AND YOU, despite the presence of hands-on producer Rick Ruben. The country-folk duo continue to add elements of pop and hillbilly rock to a country/bluegrass foundation on the 2009 LP, a record with a newfound emphasis on piano and nuanced arrangements. Working with a larger budget allows the group to add small flourishes — a cello line here, a keyboard crescendo there — but the resulting music is rarely grand, focusing on textures rather than sheer volume. Scott and Seth Avett share vocals throughout the album, delivering their lyrics in a speak-sing cadence that sounds both tuneful and conversational. Given the opportunities presented here — the ability to flank their melodies with string sections, organ swells, and Harmonium — the two devote more focus to slower songs, eschewing the barn-burning bouncefests of their previous albums for material that better displays such sonic details. The result is an intimate, poignant album, laced with rich production that enhances, not clouds, the songwriting itself.

http://rapidshare.com/files/325881604/07_EuoamoreTu.rar

the national – white session 2007

this is the last national posting cause the rest is just single releases and i hope you have all enjoyed the rest of the stuff i uploaded

http://www.mediafire.com/?9lnb642m0dm

the national – live recordings

live on kexp

01 Start A War
02 Slow Show
03 Brainy
04 Apartment Story

http://www.mediafire.com/?3prixwjpzxm

the daytrotter sessions

01 Gospel
02 Lucky You
03 Slow Show

http://www.mediafire.com/?og1m95g1hni

the national – boxer (demos) 2007

01 Brainy (alternative)
02 Slow Show
03 Tall Saint
04 Rest Of Years
05 Santa Clara

http://www.mediafire.com/?xdz4y2y0ezr

the national – boxer 2007

On 2007’s BOXER, the National’s second full-length album for the venerable Beggars Banquet label, the Brooklyn-based indie-rock act follows up the lauded ALLIGATOR with another round of melancholy guitar-driven tunes. Led by deep-voiced vocalist Matt Berninger, who often sounds hung-over yet disarmingly articulate, the band excels at brooding mid-tempo songs, as exemplified by the world-weary “Fake Empire,” which combines political and personal themes, and “Mistaken for Strangers,” a track that recalls NYC peers Interpol, thanks in part to the punchy approach of shared producer Peter Katis.

And while his presence isn’t immediately apparent, indie hero Sufjan Stevens contributes piano to two tracks (“Racing Like a Pro” and “Ada”), adding to the National’s increasingly expansive aesthetic, which also incorporates strings and horns. Though BOXER is more subdued than ALLIGATOR, it will likely appeal to those won over by the earlier outing.

http://www.mediafire.com/?5vzmjdhoycv

the national – alligator part 1 & 2 2005

The National’s debut for Beggars Banquet Records boasts eloquent production and some of frontman Matt Berninger’s finest songs. The Brooklyn band’s sound includes elements of folk and swirling indie rock, with Berninger’s literate, emotive tunes drawing heavily on the tradition of melancholic singer/songwriters. On “Daughters of the Soho Riots,” Berninger’s baritone croon recalls Gordon Lightfoot, yet his lyrics are incisive, confessional, and decidedly contemporary. The combination of surreal imagery and genuine pathos in “Baby, We’ll Be Fine” (expressed in the song’s repeated refrain) is also representative of Berninger’s craft.

part 1 – http://www.mediafire.com/?ny0vfmzprzt

part 2 – http://www.mediafire.com/?wvu4eoffnwd

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