the black keys – thickfreakness

While the vast majority of post-punk bands who have an obvious taste for the blues seem to enjoy taking the style apart and messing around with the bits and pieces, the Black Keys are the (relative) traditionalists within the subgenre. With their two-piece, no-bass format, there’s no room for clutter or wank, and the raunchy fuzz of Dan Auerbach’s guitar (and drummer Patrick Carney’s production) owes more to the Gories/Blues Explosion/White Stripes school of aural grime than anything else, but look past all that and the Black Keys are a straight-up blues band who could probably cut an album for Alligator if they were willing to clean up their act and fill out the lineup. And Alligator would doubtless be glad to have ’em — the Black Keys’s wail is hot, primal, and heartfelt, and Auerback’s lean but meaty guitar lines and room-filling vocals drag the blues into the 21st century through sheer force of will without sounding like these guys are in any way mocking their influences. In short, if you’re looking for irony, you’re out of luck; if you want to hear a rock band confront the blues with soul, muscle, and respect, then Thickfreakness is right up your alley. Points added for the fact that the Black Keys performed, recorded, and produced Thickfreakness all by their lonesome in a single day — further proof these guys are not messing around.

http://hotfile.com/dl/51650121/3aa49a3/The_Black_Keys_-_Thickfreakness.rar.html

the black keys – Chulahoma: The Songs Of Junior Kimbrough

This seven-track EP is the Akron, Ohio, blues-rock duo’s swan song for esteemed blues label Fat Possum, and, fittingly, it’s comprised entirely of songs originally written and performed by the legendary Junior Kimbrough, one of the label’s most important discoveries. Kimbrough’s hill-country blues had and enormous impact on the Keys, and they treat songs like “Meet Me in the City” and “Keep Your Hands off Her” with the reverence they deserve, while at the same time adding their own sonic embellishments to Kimbrough’s songs as a reminder that the blues is far from a stagnant form. “Have Mercy on Me,” for example, becomes a dirgy, swampy psych-blues epic as a haunting organ line and Dan Auerbach’s fractured guitar licks lead the listener down a wonderfully dark musical back road. This brief, loving tip of the cap is a fitting reminder that as the form’s finest practitioners continue to pass away, the blues itself is still kicking hard.

http://rapidshare.com/files/131061756/Chulahoma.rar.html

coming soon

ok guys this week am going to be busy i will be uploading all my black keys stuff that i have and completing the black keys discography of what i have so far . if any ting is missing from it please feel free to post a link in comments or direct me to missing material . so stayed tuned for this one

Ryan Adams – heartbreaker demo’s

dont really know if this is going to be released but here it is anyway been waiting for this one now for a while and the rumours of it be leaked looked like it came true . enjoy

http://depositfiles.com/en/files/jsbbu0sn4

festival time

ok guys its my festival time here in the UK and i am now starting to slip into that festival mode . really looking forward to catching a few great bands around and also while be avoiding alot of shite ones around . in August i will be catching the fall live at the summer sundea festival and also danny and the champions of the world , must say danny i caught a few years back live and just was a awesome set . also heading to the end of the road festival in september probably the best festival around in the uk for bands and setting . there i will be catching wilco , felice brothers and iron and wine cant wait for that one .

anyway hope you guys are enjoying what am posting and i will try and upload some more stuff

cheers

colin

Bombay bicycle club – flaws 2010


2010 release, a stunningly beautiful acoustic album by Bombay Bicycle Club. Having finished recording their debut LP I Had The Blues But I Shook Them Loose in February 2009, the band went straight back into the studio days after they submitted the master for I Had The Blues, and started the initial recordings for this album. Recorded in between touring over the past year and a half, a few early tracks were laid down at The Church and produced by Neill MacColl (guitarist Jamie’s dad), but the rest was recorded in singer, Jack Steadman’s bedroom and produced by Jack himself. Flaws is characterized by a delicate, heart-swelling beauty and lightness of touch throughout. This more stripped down, acoustic sound – though markedly different from the majority of their debut – isn’t new for the band, as almost every single they’ve released since their earliest days has been accompanied by an acoustic b-side.

http://www.mediafire.com/?uyqmmbtdmim

the black keys – ohio

black keys – brother 2010

Retreating from the hazy Danger Mouse-fueled pot dream of Attack & Release, the Black Keys headed down to the legendary Muscle Shoals, recording their third album on their own and dubbing it Brothers. The studio, not to mention the artwork patterned after such disregarded Chess psychedelic-era relics as This Is Howlin’ Wolf’s New Album, are good indications that the tough blues band of the Black Keys earliest records is back, but the group hasn’t forgotten what they’ve learned in their inwardly psychedelic mid-period. Brothers still can get mighty trippy — the swirling chintzy organ that circles “The Only One,” the Baroque harpsichord flair of “Too Afraid to Love You” — but the album is built with blood and dirt, so its wilder moments remain gritty without being earthbound. Sonically, that scuffed-up spaciness — the open air created by the fuzz guitars and phasing, analog keyboards, and cavernous drums — is considerably appealing, but the Black Keys ace in the hole remains the exceptional songwriting Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney are so good at as they twist a Gary Glitter stomp into swamp fuzz blues, steal a title from Archie Bell & the Drells but never reference that classic Tighten Up groove, or approximate a slow `60s soul crawl on “Unknown Brother” and follow it up with a version of Jerry Butler’s “Never Gonna Give You Up,” and it’s nearly impossible to tell which is the cover. And that’s the great thing about the Black Keys in general and Brothers in particular: the past and present intermingle so thoroughly that they blur, yet there’s no affect, just three hundred pounds of joy

http://www.mediafire.com/?irtvmyyfyzt

songs about girls (mixtape)

disc 1

1.) casiotone for the painfully alone – daina flores you’re the one
2.) jens lekman – a postcard to nina
3.) elliott smith – sweet adeline
4.) the beatles – michelle
5.) avi buffalo – jessica
6.) clap your hands say yeah – emily jean stock
7.) art brut – emily kane
8.) belle & sebastian – string bean jean
9.) francoise hardy – suzanne
10.) the dodos – ashley
11.) eric’s trip – secret for julie
12.) hospital ships – oh, ramona
13.) bon iver – for emma
14.) the format – janet
15.) joanna newsom – sadie

http://www.mediafire.com/?mhzoliir5hd

disc 2

1.) tin hat – daisy bell
2.) local natives – cecilia
3.) lightning dust – antonia jane
4.) mates of state – laura
5.) shocking pinks – emily
6.) the siddeleys – love grows (where my rosemary goes)
7.) the mountain goats – jenny
8.) neutral milk hotel – naomi
9.) girls – lauren marie
10.) the microphones – oh anna
11.) the raveonettes – aly, walk with me
12.) pink floyd – julia dream
13.) sun cut flat – becka says
14.) simon & garfunkel – for emily, whenever i may find her
15.) pavement – loretta’s scars

http://www.mediafire.com/?kynnyn4jdty

brakes – beatific visions 2006

fantastic album here and everyone should own this this genre hopping album will keep you liking the brakes for a while and when you play it please do so loud VERY LOUD

http://www.mediafire.com/?gxmdintylwm

phosphorescent – here’s to taking it easy 2010

Matthew Houck may operate out of the too-cool-for-school, New York City indie rock community, but the Alabama-born mastermind behind Phosphorescent has a muse that clearly resides in warmer climates. A breezy, classic rock-tinged collection of heartbreak road ballads nursed into existence on a steady diet of the Eagles and the Band, Here’s to Taking It Easy, the first Phosphorescent release to rely on musicians other than Houck, plays like a lost piece of vinyl from the early ’70s. Houck is a generous, earnest songsmith, and his tales of love on the rocks (“Tell Me Baby [Have You Had Enough]”), love lost (“Heaven, Sittin’ Down”), and love of the South (“It’s Hard to Be Humble [When You’re From Alabama]”) feel lived in and cared for. Even on autopilot (the slight “I Don’t Care If There’s Cursing” and the hippy-drippy “Hej, Me I’m Light”), his effortless, laid-back version of modern alt-country feels like an old friend, and the weepy, sun-drenched reverb that permeates the whole affair feels authentic rather than coerced out of a Pro Tools plug-in. The only downfall is that Here’s to Taking It Easy is so easy to take that at only nine songs, it flies by in no time at all.

http://www.mediafire.com/?ygi2jjnnigl