the national – white session 2007

this is the last national posting cause the rest is just single releases and i hope you have all enjoyed the rest of the stuff i uploaded

http://www.mediafire.com/?9lnb642m0dm

Advertisements

the national – live recordings

live on kexp

01 Start A War
02 Slow Show
03 Brainy
04 Apartment Story

http://www.mediafire.com/?3prixwjpzxm

the daytrotter sessions

01 Gospel
02 Lucky You
03 Slow Show

http://www.mediafire.com/?og1m95g1hni

the national – boxer (demos) 2007

01 Brainy (alternative)
02 Slow Show
03 Tall Saint
04 Rest Of Years
05 Santa Clara

http://www.mediafire.com/?xdz4y2y0ezr

the national – boxer 2007

On 2007’s BOXER, the National’s second full-length album for the venerable Beggars Banquet label, the Brooklyn-based indie-rock act follows up the lauded ALLIGATOR with another round of melancholy guitar-driven tunes. Led by deep-voiced vocalist Matt Berninger, who often sounds hung-over yet disarmingly articulate, the band excels at brooding mid-tempo songs, as exemplified by the world-weary “Fake Empire,” which combines political and personal themes, and “Mistaken for Strangers,” a track that recalls NYC peers Interpol, thanks in part to the punchy approach of shared producer Peter Katis.

And while his presence isn’t immediately apparent, indie hero Sufjan Stevens contributes piano to two tracks (“Racing Like a Pro” and “Ada”), adding to the National’s increasingly expansive aesthetic, which also incorporates strings and horns. Though BOXER is more subdued than ALLIGATOR, it will likely appeal to those won over by the earlier outing.

http://www.mediafire.com/?5vzmjdhoycv

the national – alligator part 1 & 2 2005

The National’s debut for Beggars Banquet Records boasts eloquent production and some of frontman Matt Berninger’s finest songs. The Brooklyn band’s sound includes elements of folk and swirling indie rock, with Berninger’s literate, emotive tunes drawing heavily on the tradition of melancholic singer/songwriters. On “Daughters of the Soho Riots,” Berninger’s baritone croon recalls Gordon Lightfoot, yet his lyrics are incisive, confessional, and decidedly contemporary. The combination of surreal imagery and genuine pathos in “Baby, We’ll Be Fine” (expressed in the song’s repeated refrain) is also representative of Berninger’s craft.

part 1 – http://www.mediafire.com/?ny0vfmzprzt

part 2 – http://www.mediafire.com/?wvu4eoffnwd

the national – cherry tree e/p 2004

another addition to the national discography

http://www.mediafire.com/?1kzmchm6oml

the national – sad songs for dirty lovers 2003

For a band that’s been compared to Joy Division, Leonard Cohen, Wilco, and Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, the National sure sounds a lot more like the Czars or Uncle Tupelo on this sophomore album Sad Songs for Dirty Lovers. Where the band might lack Joy Division’s angular fury, Cohen’s existentialism, and Cave’s vampiric attack, vocalist Matt Berninger and company whip up a murky alt country meets chamber pop vibe that’s quite potent. The five-piece mostly keeps things on the country side of the fence during the album’s first half, as slide guitars and fiddles overpower just about any hint of rock styling except the drumbeat, occasional feedback, and some screeching guitar freak-outs. Toward the album’s close, the songs’ textures finally shift from country to indie rock. Berninger is more than content to roam pastures featuring small patches of emo, sadcore, and artsy strings, clearly wearing his influences on his sleeve. Indeed, album-opener “Cardinal Song” could very easily be mistaken for the Tindersticks or Cousteau, with a passage that is a virtual note for note reconstruction of a Red House Painters song. Though the band focuses on slow atmospheric songs, it’s when it kicks out the jams that the music is the most compelling. Case in point is “Slipping Husband,” with its fine melodic waves and a perfectly placed bout of screaming. “Trophy Wife” presents yet another influence; the song seems a dead ringer for the Shins. It’s hard to shake the feeling that the National is highly influenced by and studied in the bands it emulates, but the album is still worth a listen for fans of moody country-tinged lounge music. With so many influences rearing their heads and ample musical chops in the bag, the National might not be masters of any one genre, but it creates a fine amalgam nonetheless.

http://www.mediafire.com/?vj1erninwxt

Previous Older Entries