Ryan Adams – heartbreaker demo’s

dont really know if this is going to be released but here it is anyway been waiting for this one now for a while and the rumours of it be leaked looked like it came true . enjoy

http://depositfiles.com/en/files/jsbbu0sn4

danny and the champions of the world – streets of our time 2010

highly recommended

not gonna tell you to much about it . just go and listen to it . he is a great song writer

http://rapidshare.com/files/341666040/StreetsTime.zip


deer tick – more fuel for the fire e/p

2009 Deer Tick’s More Fuel for the Fire EP tops off an explosive 2009 for the band that released Rolling Stone’s “country-rock breakthrough of the year” nine months earlier. Taken mostly from a month-long recording session in upstate New York nicknamed “The Black Dirt Sessions”, More Fuel for the Fire features three new studio tracks as well as a live version of “Straight Into A Storm” (from Born on Flag Day) recorded in Charlotte, NC at the Visulite Theatre. The songs have become staples of Deer Tick’s live shows over the past year, and are already fan favorites-and that’s who this one’s for…

http://rapidshare.com/files/315629191/deer_tick_-_more_fuel_for_the_fire_-_ep.zip

original soundtrack – crazy heart 2010

“It’s all magic.” That’s the phrase the late Stephen Bruton used in September 2008 to describe working on the set of Crazy Heart, and with good reason. Actor Jeff Bridges embodies his role as an original outlaw songwriter – confident, crooked, and hardened with time. Paired with Bruton’s lyricism, co-producer T Bone Burnett’s saturated Americana backdrop, and Joel Guzman’s accordion brushes, Bridges notches a Tex-Mex trifecta starting with opener “Hold on You” that bodes well against Burnett’s other soundtrack selections, including Townes Van Zandt (“If I Needed You”), Waylon Jennings (“Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way”), and Lightnin’ Hopkins (“Once a Gambler”). The actor’s take on rustic honky-tonk original “I Don’t Know,” co-written by Bruton and Burnett, actually trumps that of ringer Ryan Bingham, though the latter’s dusty theme song “The Weary Kind” captures the film’s scope better than Springsteen’s “The Wrestler.” Bingham’s local Dead Horses rip through the roadhouse boogie “Somebody Else,” and even Colin Farrell excels in Nashville single “Gone, Gone, Gone.” It’s magic all right, and a fond final tribute to one of South Austin’s finest.

http://rapidshare.com/files/337579116/enistosopradoido.rar

clem snide – the meat of life 2010

there back clem snide drifted away a little when Eef barzeley chased and cut out a very successfull solo career . the meat of life firmly confirms that clem snide must stay around a little longer .

LINK REMOVED AS A REQUEST WAS MADE FROM CLEM SNIDE LABEL

phosphorescent – to willie 2009

album of the year 2009

In 1975, Willie Nelson released a tribute to one of the original country outlaws, Lefty Frizzell, called TO LEFTY FROM WILLIE. Phosphorescent’s TO WILLIE is an alt-country continuation of the same concept. Its 11 songs are all moderately obscure Willie Nelson tunes (no “Red Headed Stranger” or “On the Road Again”) delivered in a mournful indie country style that reveals Nelson’s oft-underestimated connection to this particular sub-genre. Highlights include “I Gotta Get Drunk” and “Reasons To Quit.”

http://www.mediafire.com/?nzz2ojytajz

avett brothers – i and love and you 2009

North Carolina sibling duo the Avett Brothers return in 2009, fresh off a few years of building a cult following for its melodic and rootsy alt-bluegrass sound, with the subdued I AND LOVE AND YOU. The opening single and title track basks in piano-pop splendor in an odd mix of Beach Boys, Byrds, and the Band.

The Avett Brothers continue charting the same musical course as EMOTIONALISM and MIGNONETTE on major-label debut I AND LOVE AND YOU, despite the presence of hands-on producer Rick Ruben. The country-folk duo continue to add elements of pop and hillbilly rock to a country/bluegrass foundation on the 2009 LP, a record with a newfound emphasis on piano and nuanced arrangements. Working with a larger budget allows the group to add small flourishes — a cello line here, a keyboard crescendo there — but the resulting music is rarely grand, focusing on textures rather than sheer volume. Scott and Seth Avett share vocals throughout the album, delivering their lyrics in a speak-sing cadence that sounds both tuneful and conversational. Given the opportunities presented here — the ability to flank their melodies with string sections, organ swells, and Harmonium — the two devote more focus to slower songs, eschewing the barn-burning bouncefests of their previous albums for material that better displays such sonic details. The result is an intimate, poignant album, laced with rich production that enhances, not clouds, the songwriting itself.

http://rapidshare.com/files/325881604/07_EuoamoreTu.rar

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