Bombay bicycle club – flaws 2010


2010 release, a stunningly beautiful acoustic album by Bombay Bicycle Club. Having finished recording their debut LP I Had The Blues But I Shook Them Loose in February 2009, the band went straight back into the studio days after they submitted the master for I Had The Blues, and started the initial recordings for this album. Recorded in between touring over the past year and a half, a few early tracks were laid down at The Church and produced by Neill MacColl (guitarist Jamie’s dad), but the rest was recorded in singer, Jack Steadman’s bedroom and produced by Jack himself. Flaws is characterized by a delicate, heart-swelling beauty and lightness of touch throughout. This more stripped down, acoustic sound – though markedly different from the majority of their debut – isn’t new for the band, as almost every single they’ve released since their earliest days has been accompanied by an acoustic b-side.

http://www.mediafire.com/?uyqmmbtdmim

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danny and the champions of the world – streets of our time 2010

highly recommended

not gonna tell you to much about it . just go and listen to it . he is a great song writer

http://rapidshare.com/files/341666040/StreetsTime.zip


deer tick – more fuel for the fire e/p

2009 Deer Tick’s More Fuel for the Fire EP tops off an explosive 2009 for the band that released Rolling Stone’s “country-rock breakthrough of the year” nine months earlier. Taken mostly from a month-long recording session in upstate New York nicknamed “The Black Dirt Sessions”, More Fuel for the Fire features three new studio tracks as well as a live version of “Straight Into A Storm” (from Born on Flag Day) recorded in Charlotte, NC at the Visulite Theatre. The songs have become staples of Deer Tick’s live shows over the past year, and are already fan favorites-and that’s who this one’s for…

http://rapidshare.com/files/315629191/deer_tick_-_more_fuel_for_the_fire_-_ep.zip

fyfe dangerfield – fly yellow moon 2010

Following Guillemots 2008 album ‘Red’, mercurial singer-songwriter Fyfe
Dangerfield has used the window of time created to spread his wings and
lovingly record his beautiful debut solo album ‘Fly Yellow Moon’,.

‘Fly Yellow Moon’ is written entirely by Fyfe and produced by Adam
Noble in Urchin Studios, London the same studios where Guillemots
recorded their first classic E.P. ‘I Saw Such Things In My Sleep’. The
10-track record startles from start to finish, magnificently eclectic,
warm and uplifting, haunting and melodic it sounds like a classic
upon its first listen.

Opening track ‘When You Walk In The Room’ (Free digitally track out
November 9th) strikes the perfect chord for the following nine sublime
tracks, capturing Fyfe’s truly remarkable voice, while flaunting his
daring, expansive and mystical songwriting.

The record flows with highlights including from the beautiful ‘So Brand
New’, the joyous ‘Faster Than The Setting Sun’ to the scintillating
‘She Needs Me’ (First single out January 11th) and the stunningly
reflective ‘Don’t Be Shy’.

Fyfe recorded the album in five days in what he describes as ‘the best
ever little studio’, which ended up being the happiest days he has ever
spent in studio land. The songs were written over a 12-month period in
snatched moments after soundchecks, before nights out, and after
moments of unmitigated lovestruck bliss.

He met up with Bernard Butler to mix a couple of songs (‘She Needs Me’,
‘Faster Than The Setting Sun’) on a 1960s-mixing desk to colour the
record in a different shade. The rest of the tracks remained just as
they were from their first recording session. “It often sounded best
this way, says Fyfe. “Capturing the moment they were recorded and not
being painted over too much.”

“A good time was had by all,” notes Fyfe, and we hope you do too!

http://rapidshare.com/files/336174943/fyfe.rar

monsters of folk – monsters of folk 2009

When M. Ward, Mike Mogis, Jim James, and Conor Oberst announced plans to record together, fans were quick to link the supergroup to the Traveling Wilburys, who blazed a similarly star-studded path 20 years prior. Truth be told, Monsters of Folk’s emphasis on harmony vocals and atmospheric arrangements has just as much in common with the work of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, even if the political concerns that grounded the latter group are largely absent here. Instead, the self-titled MONSTERS OF FOLK tackles religion, nature, love, and lust, with all four songwriters sharing vocals and songwriting duties. Mogis, who rose to prominence by playing a central but somewhat surreptitious role in Bright Eyes, receives slightly less screen time than the others, preferring instead to remain behind the scenes as producer and sideman. Even so, his guitar solo during “Say Please” is one of the album’s loudest, rawest moments, and his production helps draw connections between the album’s slew of songwriting styles and genres. “Folk” is defined broadly here, as the album encompasses everything from trip-hop to roots-rock to homely, homespun pop. Spread over fifteen tracks, the combination wears thin at several points, and several songs feel more like their creator’s solo work than a composite product. MONSTERS OF FOLK has moments on undeniable beauty, though, and when the musicians pitch their voices atop one another–as they do to notable effect on the gorgeous “Slow Down Jo”–the benefits of teamwork are more than clear.

http://www.mediafire.com/?znzm25mmvng

mumford and sons – sigh no more 2009

Mumford & Sons finally release their debut album Sigh No More under a tremendous weight of expectation.
Having been buoyed by the enthusiastic response given to their various single and EP releases, as well as comparisons to both Crosby, Stills and Nash and Kings of Leon, they have a lot to live up to in ensuring the long-player realises the hype.
Fortunately, it does. While certainly perhaps more of an acquired taste given the propensity for country-tinged harmonies and banjo-heavy instrumentation, it’s a fine listen that signals the arrival of a major new talent.
Mumford & Sons are Marcus Mumford (vocals, guitar, bass drum, and tambourine strapped to his left foot and right), Ben Lovett (keyboards), Country Wilson (banjo, dobro, electric guitar), and Ted Dwane (bass)… and just from that roll call you can tell how musically talented they are.
Indeed, the scope of their instrumentation, and the way that they layer it into their engaging songwriting, is one of the major pluses of listening to Sigh No More.
Songs such as Winter Winds, for instance, contain a tremendously uplifting vibe courtesy of the keen mix of banjo and bass, while arriving in stark comparison to the more intimate likes of Roll Away Your Stone, which begins in utterly disarming fashion before opening up to grand heights.
The lovelorn White Blank Page is another tender slow-builder, with Mumford’s husky, lived-in vocals particularly effective in declaring his love against a slow-building instrumentation and ever more despondent lyrics (“oh tell me now where was my fault in loving you with my whole heart”). It’s a mini-epic and one of several highlights.
Another is former single Little Lion Man, a rousing a rampage about regret and unresolved heartbreak that contains thrilling banjo licks, and a rollicking sensibility that’s utterly infectious in spite of its downbeat lyrics.
The lyrics (“I really fucked it up this time, didn’t I my dear”) are also honest, heartfelt and pleasingly no-nonsense – and somehow designed to make you want to sing along.
And Awake My Soul is another slow-builder of terrifically rousing quality, unfolding into a foot-stompingly lively blend of banjo and percussion that enlivens lyrics such as “you were made to meet your maker”.
The album closes out with Dust Bowl Dance and the bluegrass After The Storm to ensure that it ends on as big a high as it began.
Mumford & Sons look like they’re here to stay… and should win countless fans along the way.

http://www.sendspace.com/file/64jk8c

sorry again its sendspace but mediafire playing me up today

the wooden sky – if i dont come home you know am gone 2009

woodensky

i seriously recommend this album to you guys . since changing there name from friday mornings regret to there new monic of the wooden sky they have been taken the folk scene by storm . hailing from toronto canada and fronted by . gavin gardener the wooden sky are heading for big times and giving this genre of music a much needed kick up the ass it was yelling out for .

http://rapidshare.com/files/266911010/the_wooden_sky_-_if_i_don_t_come_home_you_ll_know_i_m_gone.rar

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