the black keys – the big come up 2002

On paper, two Ohio white guys forming a drum-and-guitar blues duo seemed like the last thing the world needed in 2002. Fortunately, the guys revisiting the tried and true were guitarist-vocalist Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney a.k.a. the Black Keys. With the former’s blown-cone distortion and slinky riffs, and the latter’s positively Bonham-esque way of inhabiting each change with a loose power, they smacked judgment out of one’s brain before anyone could call it cliche. Taking cues from Fat Possum-centric blues legends like Junior Kimbrough and R.L. Burnside (both covered here on the first two tracks) and garage fetishists like Billy Childish and Jack White alike, the Akron duo arrived with swagger on these 13 tracks. Tackling covers traditional (like Sleepy John Estes’s “Leavin’ Trunk”) and non (the Beatles’s “She Said, She Said”) and their own workouts (the aptly titled “Heavy Soul”), THE BIG COME UP wins on the strength of Auerbach’s ravagedly expressive vocals–which match the egdes in his guitar tone crag for crag.

http://www.mediafire.com/error.php?errno=320

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live double album here from the black keys cant recommend this one enough its just full of awesomeness so go grab it .

part 1 – http://www.mediafire.com/?zj2yiqgqyit

part 2 – http://www.mediafire.com/?azjyjhjnizc

the black keys – the black keys 2007

sorry about the image guys this is all i could get anyway its a live e/p from these guys given away free with the mojo magazine back in 2007 .

http://www.mediafire.com/?nzykgzqmrj5

the black keys – thickfreakness

While the vast majority of post-punk bands who have an obvious taste for the blues seem to enjoy taking the style apart and messing around with the bits and pieces, the Black Keys are the (relative) traditionalists within the subgenre. With their two-piece, no-bass format, there’s no room for clutter or wank, and the raunchy fuzz of Dan Auerbach’s guitar (and drummer Patrick Carney’s production) owes more to the Gories/Blues Explosion/White Stripes school of aural grime than anything else, but look past all that and the Black Keys are a straight-up blues band who could probably cut an album for Alligator if they were willing to clean up their act and fill out the lineup. And Alligator would doubtless be glad to have ’em — the Black Keys’s wail is hot, primal, and heartfelt, and Auerback’s lean but meaty guitar lines and room-filling vocals drag the blues into the 21st century through sheer force of will without sounding like these guys are in any way mocking their influences. In short, if you’re looking for irony, you’re out of luck; if you want to hear a rock band confront the blues with soul, muscle, and respect, then Thickfreakness is right up your alley. Points added for the fact that the Black Keys performed, recorded, and produced Thickfreakness all by their lonesome in a single day — further proof these guys are not messing around.

http://hotfile.com/dl/51650121/3aa49a3/The_Black_Keys_-_Thickfreakness.rar.html

black keys – brother 2010

Retreating from the hazy Danger Mouse-fueled pot dream of Attack & Release, the Black Keys headed down to the legendary Muscle Shoals, recording their third album on their own and dubbing it Brothers. The studio, not to mention the artwork patterned after such disregarded Chess psychedelic-era relics as This Is Howlin’ Wolf’s New Album, are good indications that the tough blues band of the Black Keys earliest records is back, but the group hasn’t forgotten what they’ve learned in their inwardly psychedelic mid-period. Brothers still can get mighty trippy — the swirling chintzy organ that circles “The Only One,” the Baroque harpsichord flair of “Too Afraid to Love You” — but the album is built with blood and dirt, so its wilder moments remain gritty without being earthbound. Sonically, that scuffed-up spaciness — the open air created by the fuzz guitars and phasing, analog keyboards, and cavernous drums — is considerably appealing, but the Black Keys ace in the hole remains the exceptional songwriting Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney are so good at as they twist a Gary Glitter stomp into swamp fuzz blues, steal a title from Archie Bell & the Drells but never reference that classic Tighten Up groove, or approximate a slow `60s soul crawl on “Unknown Brother” and follow it up with a version of Jerry Butler’s “Never Gonna Give You Up,” and it’s nearly impossible to tell which is the cover. And that’s the great thing about the Black Keys in general and Brothers in particular: the past and present intermingle so thoroughly that they blur, yet there’s no affect, just three hundred pounds of joy

http://www.mediafire.com/?irtvmyyfyzt

brakes – beatific visions 2006

fantastic album here and everyone should own this this genre hopping album will keep you liking the brakes for a while and when you play it please do so loud VERY LOUD

http://www.mediafire.com/?gxmdintylwm

stereophonics – keep calm and carry on 2010

2009 release, the stunning seventh studio album from the Welsh Alt-Rock band. The album was written and co-produced by Kelly Jones along with Mercury Award winning producer, Jim Abiss. (Arctic Monkeys/Kasabian). Five of their six previous studio albums have all gone straight to #1 in the UK and their 2008 hits collection, Decade In The Sun, sold almost a million copies in two months. 12 tracks including the lead single ‘Innocent’. Universal. 2009.

http://rapidshare.com/files/349805818/8TrackKC09.rar

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