the national – cherry tree e/p 2004

another addition to the national discography

http://www.mediafire.com/?1kzmchm6oml

the national – sad songs for dirty lovers 2003

For a band that’s been compared to Joy Division, Leonard Cohen, Wilco, and Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, the National sure sounds a lot more like the Czars or Uncle Tupelo on this sophomore album Sad Songs for Dirty Lovers. Where the band might lack Joy Division’s angular fury, Cohen’s existentialism, and Cave’s vampiric attack, vocalist Matt Berninger and company whip up a murky alt country meets chamber pop vibe that’s quite potent. The five-piece mostly keeps things on the country side of the fence during the album’s first half, as slide guitars and fiddles overpower just about any hint of rock styling except the drumbeat, occasional feedback, and some screeching guitar freak-outs. Toward the album’s close, the songs’ textures finally shift from country to indie rock. Berninger is more than content to roam pastures featuring small patches of emo, sadcore, and artsy strings, clearly wearing his influences on his sleeve. Indeed, album-opener “Cardinal Song” could very easily be mistaken for the Tindersticks or Cousteau, with a passage that is a virtual note for note reconstruction of a Red House Painters song. Though the band focuses on slow atmospheric songs, it’s when it kicks out the jams that the music is the most compelling. Case in point is “Slipping Husband,” with its fine melodic waves and a perfectly placed bout of screaming. “Trophy Wife” presents yet another influence; the song seems a dead ringer for the Shins. It’s hard to shake the feeling that the National is highly influenced by and studied in the bands it emulates, but the album is still worth a listen for fans of moody country-tinged lounge music. With so many influences rearing their heads and ample musical chops in the bag, the National might not be masters of any one genre, but it creates a fine amalgam nonetheless.

http://www.mediafire.com/?vj1erninwxt

the national – black sessions 2005

if your a national fan and you dont have this then you gotta ask yourself WHY . this is an awesome album .

01 All The Wine
02 Secret Meeting
03 Driver Surprise Me
04 Lit Up
05 Cherry Tree
06 Baby, We’ll Be Fine
07 Geese
08 City Middle
09 Looking For Astronauts
10 Daughters Of The Soho Riots
11 Abel
13 Wasp Nest

http://www.mediafire.com/?d99mfzdo58z

lets hope you enjoy this one danielle also coming up is

sad songs for dirty lovers 2003

cherry tree ep 2004

alligator pt 1 & 2 2005

boxer 2007

boxer (demos) 2007 5 tracks only

live on kexp 2007

daytrotter session 2007

white sessions 2007

live on fair game 2008

then we have the singles collection

lit up 2005

secret meeting 2005

abel 2005

mistaken for strangers 2007

apartment story 2007

the national – the national 2001

been playing this album alot over the last few days never seems to let you down and there are some of the nationals best work on this debut album this one comes highly recommended .

This Ohio-based band strikes a lush, adorable balance between the country-pop of bands such as Jayhawks and Golden Smog and the gloomy, depressing crooning of Tom Waits. Lead singer Matt Berninger manages to transcend leveling the fine background with some reflection and introspection on “Cold Girl Fever” and “Watching You Well.” The country hues touched on in “American Mary” are only surpassed by the album’s perfect song “Theory of the Crows,” a morbid waltz through loneliness and loss. Throughout it all, the band manages not only to exceed their pigeonholed genres but gives a fresh perspective with brilliantly crafted numbers. Starting up where Wilco left off with their Summerteeth album, the group delivers a generous heaping of Americana and alt-country. Brilliant.

http://www.mediafire.com/?vkmj92b5xyw

monsters of folk – monsters of folk 2009

When M. Ward, Mike Mogis, Jim James, and Conor Oberst announced plans to record together, fans were quick to link the supergroup to the Traveling Wilburys, who blazed a similarly star-studded path 20 years prior. Truth be told, Monsters of Folk’s emphasis on harmony vocals and atmospheric arrangements has just as much in common with the work of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, even if the political concerns that grounded the latter group are largely absent here. Instead, the self-titled MONSTERS OF FOLK tackles religion, nature, love, and lust, with all four songwriters sharing vocals and songwriting duties. Mogis, who rose to prominence by playing a central but somewhat surreptitious role in Bright Eyes, receives slightly less screen time than the others, preferring instead to remain behind the scenes as producer and sideman. Even so, his guitar solo during “Say Please” is one of the album’s loudest, rawest moments, and his production helps draw connections between the album’s slew of songwriting styles and genres. “Folk” is defined broadly here, as the album encompasses everything from trip-hop to roots-rock to homely, homespun pop. Spread over fifteen tracks, the combination wears thin at several points, and several songs feel more like their creator’s solo work than a composite product. MONSTERS OF FOLK has moments on undeniable beauty, though, and when the musicians pitch their voices atop one another–as they do to notable effect on the gorgeous “Slow Down Jo”–the benefits of teamwork are more than clear.

http://www.mediafire.com/?znzm25mmvng

mumford and sons – sigh no more 2009

Mumford & Sons finally release their debut album Sigh No More under a tremendous weight of expectation.
Having been buoyed by the enthusiastic response given to their various single and EP releases, as well as comparisons to both Crosby, Stills and Nash and Kings of Leon, they have a lot to live up to in ensuring the long-player realises the hype.
Fortunately, it does. While certainly perhaps more of an acquired taste given the propensity for country-tinged harmonies and banjo-heavy instrumentation, it’s a fine listen that signals the arrival of a major new talent.
Mumford & Sons are Marcus Mumford (vocals, guitar, bass drum, and tambourine strapped to his left foot and right), Ben Lovett (keyboards), Country Wilson (banjo, dobro, electric guitar), and Ted Dwane (bass)… and just from that roll call you can tell how musically talented they are.
Indeed, the scope of their instrumentation, and the way that they layer it into their engaging songwriting, is one of the major pluses of listening to Sigh No More.
Songs such as Winter Winds, for instance, contain a tremendously uplifting vibe courtesy of the keen mix of banjo and bass, while arriving in stark comparison to the more intimate likes of Roll Away Your Stone, which begins in utterly disarming fashion before opening up to grand heights.
The lovelorn White Blank Page is another tender slow-builder, with Mumford’s husky, lived-in vocals particularly effective in declaring his love against a slow-building instrumentation and ever more despondent lyrics (“oh tell me now where was my fault in loving you with my whole heart”). It’s a mini-epic and one of several highlights.
Another is former single Little Lion Man, a rousing a rampage about regret and unresolved heartbreak that contains thrilling banjo licks, and a rollicking sensibility that’s utterly infectious in spite of its downbeat lyrics.
The lyrics (“I really fucked it up this time, didn’t I my dear”) are also honest, heartfelt and pleasingly no-nonsense – and somehow designed to make you want to sing along.
And Awake My Soul is another slow-builder of terrifically rousing quality, unfolding into a foot-stompingly lively blend of banjo and percussion that enlivens lyrics such as “you were made to meet your maker”.
The album closes out with Dust Bowl Dance and the bluegrass After The Storm to ensure that it ends on as big a high as it began.
Mumford & Sons look like they’re here to stay… and should win countless fans along the way.

http://www.sendspace.com/file/64jk8c

sorry again its sendspace but mediafire playing me up today

wow

Jason Molina and Will Johnson Collaborate on New LP, Plot European Tour

Call this the Phantoms of Folk. Call this two lone wolves running together for one dark blissout of a night. Two of the finest indie-folk songwriters of the last decade come together under the Texas sky to quietly lay to tape 14 crushing, haunting tunes, leaving space enough in each to match their surroundings. In this collaboration between Jason Molina and Will Johnson, each seem to hold the other’s talents to fire and elevate both performance and creativity. In the friendly sharing of ideas, Molina and Johnson become two poet’s poets in a workshop, aimed to craft a singular, searing elegy.

Will Johnson describes this alignment of two red stars: “For ten days we wrote, co-wrote, workshopped, complimented, scrutinized, drank, invited friends to come play music, smoked, made lots of notes and drawings, drank a little more and shot the BB gun off the back porch when we just needed some time and space. In the throes of all this, our record was made in the late February sun.”

The album is also abound with contributions from other fine musicians, such as Magnolia Electric Co.’s Michael Kapinus and Texas songwriter Sarah Jaffe, whose plaintive vocals “All Gone, All Gone,” accompanied by the sound of a crying saw, will stir in your gut for days. Other accomplished contributors include Howard Draper, Bryan VanDivier and Scott Danbom.

Hear an mp3 of Molina and Johnson’s “Twenty Cycles to the Ground” HERE.

or down load album http://www.mediafire.com/?gzmnlyyojz4

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